Profile

Dr Stuart MacNeill:
SULSA Reader in Translational Biology



Chromosomal DNA replication in eukaryotic cells requires the complex interplay of a large number of essential and non-essential protein factors in a temporally- and spatially-coordinated manner. Determining how these factors act together to replicate the genome is central to understanding how the integrity of the genome is maintained within, and across, generations and how genetic diseases such as cancer are avoided. The components of the replication machinery are also potential targets for anti-proliferative drugs and can be used as diagnostic markers for the proliferative state.

The complexity of the replication machinery favours the use of simple model systems to dissect problems of protein structure, function and regulation. Indeed, much of what we know about the eukaryotic replication apparatus has come from model system studies. In the MacNeill lab, research is focused on dissecting the molecular biology of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication and genome stability using two highly contrasting model systems, the eukaryotic fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the genetically-tractable halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii. We use a variety of methods to address questions of protein structure and function within the chromosome replication apparatus, including genetics and molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics and bioinformatics.

 



Chromosomal DNA replication in eukaryotic cells requires the complex interplay of a large number of essential and non-essential protein factors in a temporally- and spatially-coordinated manner. Determining how these factors act together to replicate the genome is central to understanding how the integrity of the genome is maintained within and across generations and how genetic diseases such as cancer are avoided. The components of the replication machinery are also potential targets for anti-proliferative drugs and can be used as diagnostic markers for the proliferative state. The complexity of the replication machinery favours the use of simple model systems to dissect problems of protein structure, function and regulation. Indeed, much of what we know about the eukaryotic replication apparatus has come from model system studies. In the MacNeill lab, research is focused on dissecting molecular mechanisms of chromosomal DNA replication and genome stability in eukaryotic cells using two highly contrasting genetically tractable model systems, the eukaryotic fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. We use a variety of methods to address questions of protein structure and function within the chromosome replication apparatus, including genetics and molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics and bioinformatics. In addition, the group has recently begun to isolate and characterise protein complexes predicted to be essential for nuclear DNA replication in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, the causitive agent of African sleeping sickness, with a view towards screening for small molecule inhibitors of their functions as a starting point on the journey towards the development of novel anti-trypanosomal therapeutics.

source: symbiosis


Recent Publications:

Recent publications


5  (of 70 published available) for sam31. (source: University of St Andrews PURE)
Please click title of any item for full details.

2018 (22/10)
PLoS Pathogens
vol.14 
(Article)
Branched late-steps of the cytosolic iron-sulphur cluster assembly machinery of Trypanosoma brucei
Priscila Peña-Diaz, Alexander C. Haindrich, Somsuvro Basu, Eva Kriegová, Antonio J. Pierik, Roland Lill, Stuart MacNeill, Terry K Smith, Julius Lukeš 
Keywords: QH301 BiologyDAS
2018 (16/2)
Nucleic Acids Research
vol.46 pp.1441-1456
(Article)
Insights into the evolutionary conserved regulation of Rio ATPase activity
Robert Knüppel, Regitse Christensen, Fiona Gray, Dominik Esser, Daniela Strauss, Jan Medenbach, Bettina Siebers, Stuart MacNeill, Nicole LaRonde, Sébastien Ferreira-Cerca 
Keywords: QH301 Biology, QD ChemistryNDAS