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Conformational order in an intrinsically disordered protein

Conformational order in an intrinsically disordered protein

Conformational order in an intrinsically disordered protein  Post-translational modification of proteins with ubiquitin represents a widely used mechanism for cellular regulation. Ubiquitin is covalently linked to the targeted protein by an E3 ligase. Although the...

CoB new webpage goes live.

CoB new webpage goes live.

The new webpage has just been launched! We want to thank every member of the Centre for their help, comments, proofreading and for sending all the material (videos, research information, microscopy images, etc). We are very grateful to Steve Smart (Information Officer...

Ultraviolet light has bright future in fight against Covid-19

Ultraviolet light has bright future in fight against Covid-19

Ultraviolet light has bright future in fight against Covid-19 A particular type of ultraviolet light known as far-UVC could be safely used for air disinfection in public places without harming people, according to new research carried out jointly at the University of...

Fighting TB with light and sound

Fighting TB with light and sound

Fighting TB with light and sound A UK-wide research team, led by the Schools of Physics and Astronomy and Medicine at University of St Andrews, have developed an innovative way to monitor the reaction of living bacteria to antibiotics using lasers and sound. This new...

Feel the beat: implanted microlasers scan heart from inside

Feel the beat: implanted microlasers scan heart from inside

It sounds like science fiction – but lasers beating to the rhythm of a live heart is exactly what researchers at the University of St Andrews have developed to improve the understanding of heart failure and to help develop more effective treatments.
The research, published in Nature Photonics today (Doi: 10.1038/s41566-020-0631-z) comes in the year in which the laser marks 60 years since it’s invention

Single molecule FRET unveils ubiquitin transfer mechanism

Single molecule FRET unveils ubiquitin transfer mechanism

The Laboratory for Biophysics and Biomolecular Dynamics incollaboration with Prof. R. Hay and Dr. Emma Branigan at Dundee University, demonstrates using smFRET that ubiquitin transfer by RING E3 ligases occurs from a close conformation of the E2~Ub complex. The work has just been published in Nature Communications volume 11, Article number: 2846 (2020)