Autumn 2014: our data keeps growing

As autumn cools the air and our coasts become increasingly wild, wet and windy, CBESS members give a recap of events over the last three months. The collection of CBESS data continues to grow, with more and more samples being processed each day. This is providing the Data Analysis Working Group (DAWG) with an increasingly complex dataset to explore. With Theme 1 (socio-economic and ecological data collection) nearing completion, researchers are beginning to look at Themes 2 and 3: scale effects and context dependency on biodiversity and ecosystem service relationships.

 

From left to right: Daniel Wohlgemuth, Stephen Watson, Prof Martin Solan, Dr Jasmin Godbold, Joseph Kenworthy, Prof David Paterson, Dr Tasman Crowe, Kate Wade, Marie Paterson

Last week several members of the CBESS team descended on Qingdao, China for the 3rd World Conference on Marine Biodiversity. Click here for further info.

 

 

 

Saltmarsh and climate change_wKelly Redeker, from the University of York, provides an overview of his research in the Essex marshes, asking the question of whether creating new saltmarshes will help or hinder climate change. Click here for further info.

 

 

saltmarsh flume photo_thumbnailCBESS members of the Cambridge Coastal Research Unit, together with a team of researchers from Germany and the Netherlands, have conducted the largest-ever laboratory experiment to investigate how waves are dissipated by coastal salt marshes during storms. Click here for the update by Dr Iris Möller.

Cartmel marsh in Morecambe Bay.

Cartmel marsh in Morecambe Bay.

 

 

The Eddy Covariance team at the University of St Andrews have had a busy summer collecting additional chamber CO2 flux data. Read more here.

Lydia Bach and other CBESS PhD students update us on their resarch

Lydia Bach and other CBESS PhD students update us on their resarch

 

 

The University of St Andrews welcomes a new PhD student to the lab, Ben Taylor, who will be investigating salt marsh restoration and the potential to subsidise such projects through the blue carbon market.

Lydia Bach, of Queen’s University Belfast, provides us with a blog update on lab work and her trips overseas.

Cai Ladd commenced his PhD at the University of Bangor earlier this year, investigating interactions of biological and physical processes on patterns of saltmarsh accretion and erosion. Click here for his non-technical summary and here for first blog instalment.

Cambridge PhD student James Tempest has also provides us with a summary of his research: click here to learn more about his efforts to improve our understanding and quantification of wave and tidal flow reduction caused by saltmarsh vegetation.

Researchers head out across the bay.

Researchers head out across the bay.

Finally, a reminder that applications for our NERC funded advanced training course – Biodiversity & Ecosystem Service Assessment in the Coastal Margin (BESA) – close on 14th November. A more detailed course outline has now been created and can be found on the following link. Please continue to spread the word!