Outreach

The XX Factor – addressing gender bias issues and science careers

As part of the Women in Science festival, over 90 p6/7 (10-11 year old) children from 3 local schools visited the University of St Andrews to listen to and meet female science PhD students through an event called the XX Factor. The purpose of this event was to encourage children from an early age to consider scientific careers, and to be aware of the breadth of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects. In addition, the event was to provide the children (boys and girls) with positive female role models who can inspire and showcase that science is just as relevant for females as it is for males.

See full story here

St Andrews BioBlitz 2015

The Bioblitz aims to promote citizen participation in the collection of scientific data and also to develop novel ways of using this kind of data to address important ecological questions.

Over 24 hours, participants are be involved in a series of sampling events to find and identify as many species of plants and animals as possible in the area around the Scottish Oceans Institute by East Sands in St Andrews.

In the 2015 event in June 636 species were identified.  You can find out much more about bioBlitz and learn more about how to get involved in other ecological projects on BioBlitz’s Facebook page.

St Andrews Bioblitz 2014

The British Ecological Society has awarded Dr Alfredo Ojanguren an Outreach grant to help organise St Andrews Bioblitz 2014.

The Bioblitz aims at promoting citizen participation in the collection of scientific data and also developing novel ways of using this kind of data to address important ecological questions.
Over 24 h, participants will be involved in a series of sampling events to find and identify as many species of plants and animals as possible in the area around the Scottish Oceans Institute by East Sands in St Andrews. The event will start at noon on Fri the 13th of June 2014.
S
Participants will include students (from elementary school to postgraduates), volunteers, experts, scientists and anyone interested in nature and outdoor activities.

The dataset generated will be used to study the ‘completeness’ of the species lists produced for different taxa or by different methods. This knowledge will be publicly available and will provide a baseline record that will allow identifying invasive species, and those that might be shifting their ranges north as a consequence of climate change.