Careers bookmark

During the International Day of Women and Girls in Science lecture today the Biology Equality and Diversity Committee will be distributing bookmarks highlighting a new webpage discussing some of the careers options for school students, undergraduates, and postgraduates studying biology. The webpage has been designed by E&D Committee members, in conjunction with others in the School/University who have experience of offering career advice. In addition we have included a short section highlighting the work of the E&D committee and a ‘biology for all’ section.

The webpage can be found here or at the short link www.st-andrews.ac.uk/go/biocareers.

 

 

Watch ‘Narwhal Nights’ lecture online

The International Day of Women and Girls in Science will be marked by a public lecture by Professor Terrie Williams:

Narwhal Nights: Discoveries Along The Scientific Road Less Travelled

Tuesday 5th February 2019, 1pm at the Byre Theatre. More details can be found here.

Unfortunately tickets for the event sold out quickly, but if you don’t already have a ticket, you can still watch the lecture as it will be live streamed online.

Alternatively you can drop by the Byre Theatre box office five minutes before the lecture to claim any uncollected tickets.

Please note any unclaimed tickets will be released if they are not collected within five minutes of the start time. If you have a ticket but won’t be able to use it, please return it to the Byre Theatre so someone else can attend.

A video of the lecture will be available on the BE&D website after the event.

Professor Sascha Hooker

Professor Sascha Hooker joined in the graduation celebrations on Thursday 6 December when she was appointed to the position of professor alongside other colleagues from across the University. As is customary, new professors are presented with a book of their choice by the Principal on receiving their professorship. Sascha selected Life and Letters of Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker O.M., G.C.S.I. Volume 1 and 2.

Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817–1911) was one of the most eminent botanists of the later 19th century, a close friend of Charles Darwin and great great grandfather to Professor Hooker.

Sascha, who reduced her hours to work part-time 14 years ago, is also notable for being the first half-time academic at the University to be promoted to professor.

Sascha led the Biology E&D committee to achieve their Athena SWAN award in 2018, and is a role model to many in the School of how to manage time to balance a successful career with a busy home life.

Congratulations Sascha!

Promotion workshop

The academic promotions workshop took place on the 4th December 2018 in the BMS lecture theatre. There were presentations from Mhairi Stewart (Head of HR) and Malcolm White laying out the structure of the promotions procedure, how it is viewed centrally by the University and some of the particularities specific to Biology. It was an informal event that resulted in lots of interaction and audience participation – both from people asking questions and others sharing their personal experiences.

In total 22 academics attended and feedback was generally positive with 77% of attendees scoring the event a 4/5 or higher. The most common feedback comment was that people wanted more detail and examples of the steps and forms of the promotions process, which we will incorporate into future events.

The 2019 round of promotions has now been launched.

 

International Day of Women and Girls in Science, 5 February 2019

To celebrate the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we welcome you to a public lecture by Professor Terrie Williams:

Narwhal Nights: Discoveries Along The Scientific Road Less Travelled

Tuesday 5th February 2019, 1pm at the Byre Theatre

Professor Terrie Williams studies large mammalian predators. Understanding how these magnificent animals survive in a world that is constantly changing has been the focus of Terrie’s research for three decades. In her public lecture, Terrie will describe her research on narwhals, the arctic-dwelling whales often dubbed the unicorn of the sea. Terrie is a comparative ecophysiologist and Director of the Center for Marine Mammal Research and Conservation at the University of California Santa Cruz.

The talk is free, but ticketed. Tickets are available from the Byre Theatre, or from Lianne Baker (Harold Mitchell/Dyers Brae), Jane Williamson (SOI) and Andy Cole (Biology Hive, North Haugh). All university students and staff, as well as members of the public, are invited to attend. Tea and coffee will be served after the lecture.

Early career researchers are invited to an informal Careers in Science Q&A session with Professor Williams at 2:45pm in the Bell Pettigrew Museum. Please register your interest with Katrina Falkenberg.

This event celebrates the United Nations International Day of Women and Girls in Science. Each year, the School of Biology’s Equality and Diversity Committee hosts a public lecture that highlights the work of an eminent biologist to celebrate some of the outstanding science being done by women.

 

Marine Mammal Science MSc students meet Dr Asha de Vos

One woman whale show!

The Marine Mammal Science MSc students met with the inspirational and charismatic cetacean scientist, Dr Asha de Vos. As a St Andrew’s alumni herself, Asha proved to the excited and awe-stricken students that the sky is no longer the limit!

She spoke animatedly to a captive audience about the struggles that she overcame in reaching her goal of becoming a marine biologist. Asha founded and directs the NGO Oceanswell which aims to educate the next generation of students from under-represented nations in marine conservation research.

The full blog post can be found here.

(Original blog written by Jenny Hampson)

International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2019

We are very pleased to announce that Professor Terrie M Williams will present the 2019 public lecture to celebrate the United Nations International Day of Women and Girls in Science, organised by the Biology Equality and Diversity committee. The lecture ‘Narwhal Nights: Discoveries Along The Scientific Road Less Traveled’ will take place on Tuesday 5th February 2019 at 1pm, in the Byre Theatre auditorium.

Professor Terrie Williams studies large mammalian predators. Understanding how these magnificent animals survive in a world that is constantly changing has been the focus of Terrie’s research for three decades. In her public lecture, Terrie will describe her research on narwhals, the arctic-dwelling whales often dubbed the unicorn of the sea. Terrie is a comparative ecophysiologist and Director of the Center for Marine Mammal Research and Conservation at the University of California Santa Cruz.

After a post-lecture tea and coffee reception, Terrie will participate in an informal Q&A session for early career researchers about life in science. This will take place in the Bell Pettigrew Natural History Museum at 2:45pm.